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20121129
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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
Current
Nov 30, 2012 5:00pm PST
mohammed morsi to relinquish the new powers he announced for himself this week. some protesters also object to the new draft egyptian constitution, which was finished friday and sent to morsi for review. meanwhile in israel you prime prime minister benjamin netanyahu government has announced plans to build housing that would physically link jerusalem with major west bank settlement. it is called counterproductive to the goals resuming direct negotiations between israel and the palestinians and achieving the two-state peace settlement that has been the u.s. diplomat i can goal for decades. for more on all these issues let's go to nicholas burns former undersecretary of state for political affairs former ambassador to n.a.t.o. and greece and now professor at the harvard kennedy school, and michael ohanlon senior fellow at the brookings institution and coauthor of "bending history"." will we and should we recognize the opposition forces? >> i think the obama administration needs to make a big decision. do you confer recognition on national council as legitimate authority of the syrian people.
Current
Nov 29, 2012 5:00pm PST
finally and to work out a solution. >> eliot: the role of president morsi in egypt in helping and nudging forward the negotiation between hamas and israel during the fighting in gaza got him kudos around the world. now there's chaos there. nobody knows apparently what this constitution will look like. what is your sense? will it be a constitution that is secular? that preserves civil liberties that is something we can look at and say egypt is now a democracy. we can embrace or will this be a shift in the other direction? >> first of all, eliot, egypt is a democracy today. president morsi was elected. but it is a democracy the way we see a democracy in the middle east. i experienced that in turkey under prime ministerrered wine and iraq under prime minister maliki. both come from religious movements. both represent partially religious parties. we'll see this against -- both represent -- the question is right now the battle is being fought out over the constitution. the role of pluralism. the role of toleran
Current
Dec 3, 2012 5:00pm PST
in the military, and it maintained some of the power under mubarak ands is that morsi needed to maintain his position at the moment. is that balances balancing act something that we in the united states can live with? >> we have no alternative. there was an election in egypt. no one should be shocked that the muslim brotherhood is trying to impose shariya law. whatever is in this constitution, and my friend here is absolutely right in his assessment, but let's remember, this constitution has to be interpreted by a legislature that is going to be dominated by even more extremist islamists. i would not be giving us too much comfort level here with what is essentially an islamist-dominated constitutional framework when you get finished with the parliament interpreting this constitution over the next few years, you're really going to have a lot to worry about. >> eric, let me turn back to that issue that the ambassador is talking about. what religious freedom will there be for non-islamic believers, for christians jews, will there be latitude for them to pursue their faith and under what constra
Current
Nov 28, 2012 5:00pm PST
be a marchbury versus madison moment in egypt. you have constitutions playing their role. president morsi has been fighting hard to make sure there is an effective executive. you have a judiciary who wants to display its independence. unfortunately you don't have a parliament dissolved by egypt's equivalent of the supreme court. i think there are very serious questions about this constitutional assembly, not so much formation but 25% of it reflects the religious minorities and women have walked out because they don't think their issues are being adequately addressed. i think first and for most, what kind of document emerges. how tolerant is that document, how much support there is in terms from various segments of egyptian society, and what the judgment of the people will be when it's placed on a referendum. >> eliot: these are all serious issues and obviously we don't know what the answers are yet. you make a fascinating point when you go back to marbury v madison, we always pre-spoused there was three in the checks and balances, and there was no clear roll that we now take for granted, the
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)